Research

The Role of Perceived Popularity on Collaborative Learning: A Dyadic Perspective

Gommans, R., & Segers, E., Burk, W. J., & Scholte, R. H. J. (2013)
Manuscript revised and resubmitted. Radboud University Nijmegen. 

The current study investigated how perceived popularity and collaboration quality were associated with knowledge gain of adolescents during a collaborative learning task. Participants included 264 children aged 10-12 years (52.3% boys), who collaborated three times in same-sex dyads on a computer assignment. Results indicated that the knowledge of the more popular member at T1 predicted knowledge gain of the less popular member’s. Furthermore, mutual listening, reported by either member of the dyad, had a positive effect on the knowledge gain of the less popular member, whereas dominance of the more popular member negatively affected the knowledge gain of the less popular member. These findings imply that prior knowledge of the more popular dyad member directly affects the learning of the less popular dyad member, and that the quality of the collaboration between both dyad members affects the outcome for the less popular dyad member; more mutual listening and less dominance ensures equal participation and increases the chances of the less popular dyad member to participate sufficiently in the collaboration process.

Parts of this paper were presented at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Seattle, WA (USA), April 2013. For those of you who would like to view my poster, click on the link below to download it.
 

 

Joomla templates by a4joomla